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<h2>General Tips for 11 Plus Exam Success</h2>

  • <p><font face="Arial">Listed below are some revision

  • tips for parents and students from those who have been

  • through the ‘process’:</font></p>

  • <ul>


  • Allow them plenty of breaks, even if they’re only 5

  • or 10 minutes long. This helps them to take it all

  • in.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Bear in mind that typically a

  • child’s attention span ranges between 30 minutes to

  • 50 minutes. Part of the build up process is to

  • increase the attention span gradually.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Create a fridge list of the

  • topics within each subject you need to cover.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Revising in a few different

  • places around the house, or even in a library means

  • that taking an exam in a new place becomes easier.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Active revision is a great

  • way to learn, this means plenty of past papers or

  • simulated 11+ exam questions in exam conditions.

  • There are plenty of mock exams that can help.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">If the exam is in the morning

  • then in the run up to the exams do all the practice

  • papers around the same time as the exam so that your

  • child mentally adjusts to perform at peak at that

  • time.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Visual aids such a mind maps

  • (spider diagrams) showing all the different parts of

  • a topic that needs to be learnt. This could be

  • useful to summarise a subject, link information in

  • different ways and mark progress giving your child a

  • sense of achievement.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Try using Mnemonics. This is

  • a way of remembering information by using

  • abbreviations, words or phrases. For example, we can

  • remember colours to the rainbow by “Richard Of York

  • Gave Battle In Vain” (Taking the first letter of

  • each word to give you the first letter of the

  1. . The more personalised they are the more

  • memorable they become and making them up could loads

  • of fun and is an indirect form of revision!</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Rewards! As each 11+ topic

  • (e.g. question type) is finished or if a better mark

  • than expected is achieved, why not have a mini-treat

  • for your child and yourselves? Another way of doing

  • it is to set a target and the reward if it’s met.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">When doing practice 11+

  • papers, mirror the style that will be in the next

  • test, it could be either the standard (no choice of

  1. format or the multiple choice format. Most

  • grammar schools now use multiple choice style exam

  • papers, and usually most independent schools use

  • standard, but it’s still worth a check.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Some parents think that the

  • insisting that their child does a standard format

  • will make the multiple choice exam seem easier,

  • however those using this approach should in the run

  • up to the exam make the preparation as realistic as

  • possible to the real thing.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Doing 11+ papers under exam

  • conditions shows if the student needs to work on the

  • speed by which he/she answers as every mark counts.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Use the answer book to go

  • through a test paper to catch even the silliest

  • mistake as everybody can make errors under timed

  • conditions.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Understand what is learnt and

  • apply that knowledge to problems, for example in

  • maths, to reinforce the lesson.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Allocate more time to the

  • subjects your child is weaker in, e.g. Non-verbal

  • reasoning rather than letting him/her avoid it

  • because then it seems more daunting to cram it in

  • the end.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Focus your energy on the

  • process of studying rather than your eventual goal

  • and ultimate result.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Remember – Brain is muscle,

  • therefore just as you would after any other

  • exercise, make sure your child rests in order to

  • recover from activity and brain overload! It would

  • also help them if when they were resting the talk is

  • not still all about exams because that would be

  • counter productive too.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Plenty of exercise and

  • nutritious food is a must to keep their brains in

  • good working order – in terms of treats stay away

  • from sugary rewards!</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Another helpful tip is to

  • make sure your child is sleeping properly so that

  • they are fresh and happy for another gruelling day

  • at the 11+ treadmill. If they are having trouble, a

  • mug of hot chocolate could help or a long hot bath

  • or perhaps even an extra 15 minutes of television to

  • get their mind to relax.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">Make sure both parent and

  • child have a good night’s sleep before the 11+ exam

  • as you have to keep each other calm!</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">In the morning have a good

  • breakfast for energy and leave early so that you

  • arrive with plenty of time for the exam, this will

  • help you both calm and composed also avoid topics

  • of conversation that make you tense.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">A good thing is constructive

  • talk about the task ahead, “psyching” yourselves up

  • to face the challenge rather than avoidance because

  • that could just increase fear of the exam or of

  • failure.</font></li>

  • </ul>

  • <ul>

  • <li><font face="Arial">If your child starts to

  • panic, stop them thinking self–defeating thoughts

  • and tell them that whatever the outcome you are both

  • proud of the effort they have made. All they need to

  • do is to work calmly through the paper and do the

  • best they can.</font></li>

  • </ul>

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